file Re:1970 Buick Riviera Thread... And Now For Something Completely Different!

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26 Nov 2015 15:58 #1838 by oestek
I disabled TCS, known as the Transmission Controlled Spark, which uses the transmission speed to adjust timing. It was an early emissions control system that didn’t work very well, and these cars all run better without it.

I kept all the original wires and stuff in a box with the car. It ran better, but really not much better than it had before. The good thing is that the acceleration stumble was fixed. The old Goodyears ride nice, but spin easy as expected.

Shortly after the accelerator pump repair, the car began hesitating again. It turns out that the “new” accelerator pump plunger had torn in the carb, rendering me right back where I was.



Luckily, I had kept some old Quadrajet parts laying around, and found a replacement plunger to swap in. The parts were in a drawer on my bench for a long time, and were left over from the carb rebuild I performed on my old red ‘70. Hard to believe it was still supple and works properly after all these years.


There are lots of cool little details on this car. The headlights are original T3 bulbs that still shine brightly.



I found this bolt in the trunk… it’s a deck-lid bolt that must have been dropped when the car was being assembled on the line. It is ½ painted and has been rolling around in the trunk since 1970, so I just put it back in the spot where I found it. Kinda silly, but what the hell, right?


Kevin Oeste
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26 Nov 2015 15:59 - 26 Nov 2015 16:00 #1839 by oestek
Once I was comfortable with how it drove, I took the old sled out on a cruise to recapture some old memories from my first ‘70… White Castle. The car is a conversation starter, just like the last one!



These cars have a unique ventilation system remnant from the 1966 - 1969 cars which had louvered vents below the rear window. Air flow was supposed to exit the car through these vents.



The vents are gone on the ‘70, but the water drainage trough is still present, along with the 2 rubber drain hoses.





This car had a bad rodent smell from being stored in a shed on a farm, and I soon discovered that many mice had used the drains as an access point and built little houses in the trough. I extracted them with one of those 3-fingered “helping hand” things and blew out the remnants with compressed air… what a difference that made.



There must have been two pounds of fuzz jammed in there, along with some deceased meece. A green Car Freshener tree adds a vintage smell aroma, too.




Kevin Oeste
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Last edit: 26 Nov 2015 16:00 by oestek.

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27 Nov 2015 15:40 #1846 by Strickland
That's a neat car find Kevin. Seems strange it doesn't have much in the way of options. I always equated those cars with creature comfort options being pretty much the norm.

I still like the "tree" better than those things you stick in the vents with the liquid in them.

My wife thinks it is strange that I don't blink at the price of a nice dinner out for the two of us but can take 20 minutes searching for the best bargain in the nut and bolt aisle in the hardware store. She actually goes with me to both the auto part stores and the hardware stores sometimes. Most of the time I think it is just for her entertainment watching me.

I was looking in one of my many "storage" boxes in the garage the other day and found a new set of points for a small block chevy with a receipt that had a date of July 1970. Gave them to my neighbor for his old truck.

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27 Nov 2015 16:43 #1848 by oestek

Strickland wrote: That's a neat car find Kevin. Seems strange it doesn't have much in the way of options. I always equated those cars with creature comfort options being pretty much the norm.

I still like the "tree" better than those things you stick in the vents with the liquid in them.

My wife thinks it is strange that I don't blink at the price of a nice dinner out for the two of us but can take 20 minutes searching for the best bargain in the nut and bolt aisle in the hardware store. She actually goes with me to both the auto part stores and the hardware stores sometimes. Most of the time I think it is just for her entertainment watching me.

I was looking in one of my many "storage" boxes in the garage the other day and found a new set of points for a small block chevy with a receipt that had a date of July 1970. Gave them to my neighbor for his old truck.


Thanks Strickland!

You're right, the Riv is supposed to be all about "personal luxury", it's odd to see a stripper like this one. I guess the original owner was on the thrifty side.

I equate the Royal Pine scent with old cars. The good thing is that the Riv is losing the rodent stank, so soon we won't need to mask it with the tree. I'm guessing there is another mouse nest in the heater box, but I won't know until I pull that apart to see.

That's pretty cool about the NOS points... those will still be good to use!

Kevin Oeste
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28 Nov 2015 22:16 #1862 by oestek
This car has all the original hubcaps, but they are about as exciting as elevator music, so they will be removed from the car. My buddy Jim came through with a set of correct Buick “disc brake” Road Wheels, the optional 1966-1970 chrome plated steel wheels in 15 x 6”. They are not perfect, but they are about the same condition as the car, so they are a great match. Besides, Jim gave them to me, so I am not complaining! It was very cool of him to throw them my way.







I took a few minutes to wash ‘em up and rub a little chrome polish with 000 steel wheel. They cleaned up nicely. The black centers could use a repaint. I’ll have to get them mounted up and find a set of center caps. The Buick Road Wheel is one of the few stock wheels that I really like. Maybe someday we’ll do a larger wheel / tire package if I find the right wheel, but these always look good in my book.






Kevin Oeste
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28 Nov 2015 22:17 #1863 by oestek
I've heard that the household cleaner CLR is a good product for cleaning up rusty & scaly things without hurting paint.



This was a perfect test car to try out some CLR and see what it does.

Sorry for the camera phone photo quality.

This was an informal test, as we just mixed up some CLR we had in a 50/50 ratio and scrubbed it on with a plastic brush like the bottle says.

The results were interesting, as you'll see in the photos.

This is an overall "before" shot of the engine bay.



Here's a close-up of the area we tested first. Note the rust, dirt, scale, and other yuck on the panels and hardware.



Here's the same panel after a light scrub-brushing of CLR followed by a water rinse. The CLR is an acid product, so it needs to be thoroughly rinsed to neutralize when done.



We know that the area is still wet from water, which changes appearance of the black paint, but it looks much better. The big surprise was the bolt on the leading edge of the core support holding down the radiator shroud… it looks new.

We worked a few more areas with some good results, but the washer reservoir ,the brake booster and master cylinder cap really changed for the better. Go back to the original photo to see the difference.




Kevin Oeste
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